Welcome to the NWKFHS Blog

Sunday, 11 March 2018

Insight into occupation records

Everyone of your ancestors had to earn a living to survive, no social services and little parish support. So if you want to learn more about occupational records then Jean Stirk's workshop on 21 March 2018 will help you.
Contact workshop@nwkfhs.org.uk. There are places available for members.
Sorry, due to lack of workshop space we cannot accept non-members booking applications at this time.

Friday, 9 March 2018

New Web site goes live

The new web site has gone live www.nwkfhs.org.uk. Its been a long time coming but I feel the content and new layout have been well worth while.
There is now a members area which adds to the experience for members. It contains data available only to members.
To access the members area you need to enter your membership number and surname in caps.
Then clicking forgot password and it will take you through the process of entering a new password that you can choose.
Enjoy the site.

If you have a problem it may be because we have a small teething problem with email addresses because there are instances of two members having the same email address. Its mainly family members who for convenience have the same email address noted by the Society. So please can you change it so both family members have different email addresses.
Please let the membership@nwkfhs.org.uk, webmaster@nwkfhs.org.uk or me president@nwkfhs.org.uk know of the changed email address with your membership number in a private email. Please do not add it as a comment. Thanks

Friday, 2 March 2018

Find a spouse only 6 miles from home

The Daily Mail today (2nd March 2018) in an article by Victor Allen (science correspondent) reported a study that the 'baby boomer' generation of post WW2 typically married someone who lived six miles away. This was compared to Europe where they married 18 miles from home and in America it is 60 miles from home. The study published in the journal 'Science' co-authored by Dr Yaniv Erlich from Columbia University whose researchers trawled genealogy web sites to create a large scientific family tree of data.  The family tree is 11 generations deep covering the period 1650 to 1950.
Why the British travel less is put down to better local economic opportunities, social norms and being a small island country with closer towns and hamlets than in Europe and America.
The article mentions that before 1850 marrying into the family was common to someone who on average was a fourth cousin.
The advent of rail travel; 1820-1875; enabled people to marry partners from further afield. As did other forms of transport such as the bicycle and motor car. The study also found that women in Europe and America have migrated more than men, but men travelled further on average.
Think only of your ancestors that went to the British colonies or hunted diamonds in South Africa or gold in Australia and America.

3rd March 2018 snow cancells Dartford meeting

The weather has beaten us and the 3rd March meeting at Dartford has been cancelled. The venue is a school that is closed.
The speaker Peter Calver is available for the 10th March so watch this space to see if we can reorganise the meeting for that date.

On the bright side all this snow has meant not leaving the house and being able to spend some time doing more family history

Saturday, 24 February 2018

Transcriptions volunteers

The data backbone of Family History Societies is the transcribing and indexing of original documents. Eric Jackson in his report for the Federation of Family History Societies (FFHS) general meeting (2018) mentions the transcribers' comradery of the Lancashire ‘Crew Lists Project’ volunteers. The same atmosphere is enjoyed by NWKFHS volunteers. In addition to the transcribing activities there is also a team of volunteers creating a catalogue of the books, photographs, fiche and old documents held in the Society Library. At these sessions the comradery is created by the supply of tea, coffee and biscuits with lots of ready banter among the team. The advantage the Society has is having a room in which to work with the tools of atlases, magnifying glasses and guidance references and adjacent kitchen facilities.

Members are very welcome to join the transcription and cataloguing teams by offering their services at the regular monthly branch meetings or at the Library on any Wednesday.

Sunday, 4 February 2018

Metropolitan Police History

Ken Chamberlain at Dartford on Saturday talked about the history of the Metropolitan police force and during the presentation gave hints on researching your police ancestors. The first was to contact the metropolitan police historical collection www.metpolicehistory.co.uk and the second was the guidance notes at the TNA. The TNA under the MEPO piece number MEPO4 has a number of registers that have been digitised and are FREE to view on line. You can in 'Discovery' enter the ancestors name and  then view the actual register entry online at no cost. I managed to see the registers that gave the date of recruitment, date of leaving, warrant number and the division of members of my family who served in the police. One of these men served not in London but at Chatham Dockyard.
A good talk that surprised me in providing information that has lead to four new pieces of family history. Thanks Ken.

Sunday, 21 January 2018

The Society Photographic Albums

The Society photographic albums are in two areas. The albums in the store includes  donations from the families of deceased members, informal recording by Society officers and members, and events over the last forty years. The albums on the open shelves are photographs and postcards reproduced in a standard size to suit the album. The originals that do not suit the albums are in store.
 The albums can be browsed during the Wednesday  sessions of the Society Library and resource centre. Some of the Society event photos are better labelled than others. Please pop in and see if you can add names! All of the photographs on the open shelves are fully labelled and most dated.